10 Things to Conserve Water

 The water crisis is no longer some distant specter of climate change that people can deny. Record high temperatures and low rainfalls have created the perfect storm for the state as farmer’s fields dry up and residential wells have dried up.

Faced with such devastating changes to our environment, it’s natural to wonder what you can do to save water and do your part in helping alleviate the water crisis.

Here are ten things you can do or change to conserve water:

  1. Turn off the tap: Did you know that over half of the water use in the average household takes place in the bathroom? When you’re shaving or brushing your teeth, turn the tap off when you aren’t using the water. This can add up to some big savings.
  2. Shower Smart: According to the EPA, showering accounts for 17% of indoor water use. We can all appreciate a long, hot shower, but it’s important to use water wisely as you do. A low-flow showerhead can save both water and the energy needed to heat the extra water. Just replacing the showerhead with a more eco-friendly option can amount to big savings!
  3. Dishwashers and Laundry: Dishwashers and clothes washers have definitely made life easier for us, but make sure you have a water-efficient model to ensure you’re using the least amount of water needed to complete the task. Also, make sure you only run this appliance when the machine is fully loaded. Washing just a few things isn’t very efficient, after all!
  4. The Great Outdoors: Landscaping can be tricky when there’s not a lot of water to go around. Choose native plants that are best adapted to your environment and its natural rainfall levels. If you do need to water your lawn, it’s best to water between 6 and 10 AM. More cities are imposing watering restrictions on when and how often people can water their lawns, so be sure to check if this is the case in your area.
  5. Fix a Leak: Each year in mid-March is Fix a Leak Week. A slowly dripping faucet may seem harmless enough, but it’s estimated that the average leak can waste about 10,000 gallons of water each year it goes unfixed. Check your plumbing fixtures and irrigation systems to make sure they are sound.Environmental Protection Agency / via epa.gov
  6. Buy Less: Everything we produce takes some water to create, so make your purchases with mindfulness. When the option is available, choose recyclable options which allow the materials to be reused and therefore save water when the materials don’t have to be entirely replaced.
  7. Eat Less Animal Products: The production of meat, dairy, and eggs is especially demanding on our water supply. A typical hamburger alone takes about 630 gallons of water to produce!
  8. Compost: Food waste accounts for a large portion of the rubbish that makes it to landfills. Rather than throwing scraps and leftovers down the garbage disposal and using lots of water to flush the food away, you can make a more eco-friendly choice by choosing to compost organic material.These positive changes can help conserve water in your home and daily routine which in turn can save you some money and really help your community.

What Is Your Defination Of Water Shortage?

“What is your take on the global water shortage?” Many believed that people are not aware of the issue, or they think such a scenario wouldn’t affect them. After pondering on this question for a few minutes, I realized, this question will be on every mainstream media in the next 15 to 20 years.

In many lower-income countries where water access is a big problem, people are familiar with the idea of global water shortages. In Pakistan, it feels like the general public is more aware of global water shortages existing primarily in other countries and especially about the water shortage conditions surrounding them. There can be a shortage of water in a household, or in a community or at a larger level like in shape of drought. 

Let us first define global water shortage. If we ask any common man in Pakistan, water shortage is a lack of excess of safe potable water. There are 800,00 people globally who do not have access to water. Some people don’t have water because they can’t afford systems to convey and treat water or they live in locations where water is physically scarce. Some believe and it is a fact that globally water shortage is due to the effects of climate change, population growth, population growth, urban sprawl, human migration, pollution, lack of resources, competition, corruption and bad goverance. 

Climate change could result in longer periods of drought or intense flood events and people will experience water supply variability. Population growth and human migration, pollution from factories and homes, and competition among water users will further limit available water resources.

There are two areas of concern when thinking about a global water shortage from a North American perspective:

1) ensuring all people have equitable access to water supplies globally, and

2) ensuring that we  are learning conservation methods and preparing for times of water scarcity.

But when we turn on the tap, we don’t understand how using less water will help our community or how learning water conservation techniques could help our community. This might arise from a lack of understanding about local water policies, the energy used to treat water. 

People don’t realize how what they do is connected to the bigger picture. For example, using less water requires the municipality to treat less water which will use less energy which could mean less gas extracted for energy production. 

 What is your definition of a global water shortage?

Agriculture and Women

Gender is a socially constructed discourse in Pakistani society between men and women. It is expected that both parties are to perform certain duties to fit in the society. Culture and religion dominantly support men in each and every walk of life. The concept of gender is debated and under extreme evaluation all the time. 

Today as we see gender has become an organizing element of existing farming system. Current trends in gender in relation to agriculture is redefining the link between gender and development. 

In developing countries, a portion of women involvement in agricultural production and post-harvest activities ranges from 20 to 70 %. 

This has led to deteriorating health and work conditions, limited access to education and control over natural resources, insecure employment and low income. This is due to many factors like growing competition on agricultural markets which increases the demand for flexible and cheap labor, growing pressure on and conflicts over natural resources, the diminishing support by governments for small-scale farms and the reallocation of economic resources in favor of large agro-enterprises. Other factors include increasing exposure to risks related to natural disasters and environmental changes, worsening access to water, increasing occupational and health risks.

Women tend to be employed for labor-intensive tasks, generally earn lower wages than men and are more likely to be paid at piece rate. Also, rural women typically work longer hours than men, when one takes into account both paid productive and unpaid reproductive or domestic and care responsibilities. When these tasks are taken into account, women’s total work hours are longer than men’s in all regions Mostly women in Pakistan, work for their husband, leading to no payment for their work. Women manage the household, cattle, water and post-harvest work in fields, while men do the easy part like sowing seeds etc. 

A number of other changes will strengthen women’s contributions to agricultural production and sustainability. These include support for public services and investment in rural areas in order to improve women’s living and working conditions. It will give priority to technological development policies targeting rural and farm women’s needs and recognize their knowledge, skills, and experience in the production of food and the conservation of biodiversity. Furthermore, it will assess the negative effects and risks of farming practices and technology, including pesticides on women’s health, and take measures to reduce use and exposure. Finally, if we are to better recognize women as integral to sustainable development, it is critical to ensure gender balance in decision-making at all levels. 

Earth Temperature and Climate Change

Earth’s temperature depends on the balance between energy entering and leaving the planet’s system. When incoming energy from the sun is absorbed by the Earth system, Earth warms. When the sun’s energy is reflected back into space, Earth avoids warming. When absorbed energy is released back into space, Earth cools. Many factors, both natural and human, can cause changes in Earth’s energy balance, including:

These factors have caused Earth’s climate to change many times.

Scientists have pieced together a record of Earth’s climate, dating back hundreds of thousands of years (and, in some cases, millions or hundreds of millions of years), by analyzing a number of indirect measures of climate such as ice cores, tree rings, glacier lengths, pollen remains, and ocean sediments, and by studying changes in Earth’s orbit around the sun.

This record shows that the climate system varies naturally over a wide range of time scales. In general, climate changes prior to the Industrial Revolution in the 1700s can be explained by natural causes, such as changes in solar energy, volcanic eruptions, and natural changes in greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations.

Recent climate changes, however, cannot be explained by natural causes alone. Research indicates that natural causes do not explain most observed warming, especially warming since the mid-20thcentury. Rather, it is extremely likely that human activities have been the dominant cause of that warming.

Human activities contribute to climate change by causing changes in Earth’s atmosphere in the amounts of greenhouse gasses, aerosols (small particles), and cloudiness. The largest known contribution comes from the burning of fossil fuels, which releases carbon dioxide gas into the atmosphere.

Greenhouse gasses and aerosols affect climate by altering incoming solar radiation and outgoing infrared (thermal) radiation that are part of Earth’s energy balance. Changing the atmospheric abundance or properties of these gasses and particles can lead to a warming or cooling of the climate system.

Since the start of the industrial era (about 1750), the overall effect of human activities on climate has been a warming influence. The human impact on climate during this era greatly exceeds that due to known changes in natural processes, such as solar changes and volcanic eruptions.so we need to have control on our activities to save our future.